Category: Herbs & Supplements

CAM and cancer: Who uses CAM, and why?

Many patients with cancer use complementary and alternative medicine.

/ May 16, 2019

FDA: No CBD in dietary supplements or foods for now, but let’s talk

The FDA reminds everyone that (no matter what your state says) CBD is not a legal ingredient in dietary supplements and foods. The agency is willing to explore changes to the law but unproven claims for CBD health benefits, such cancer cures, will not be tolerated.

/ May 9, 2019

For Discussion: Should I Only Write About Fake Stuff If It Is Well-Known?

Does writing about questionable topics that are not well-known do more harm or good? There are arguments on both sides.

/ March 19, 2019

The “Evidence” for Prodovite Is Junk Science

Prodovite is a liquid nutritional supplement marketed as "nutrition you can feel." The claims are pseudoscientific nonsense and the single unblinded clinical study is junk science that relies on a bogus test: live cell microscopy.

/ March 12, 2019

FDA promises industry-friendly “modernization” of dietary supplement regulation

The FDA promises the "most significant modernization of dietary supplement regulation" in 25 years while maintaining its industry-friendly regulatory scheme.

/ February 14, 2019

Caffeine Withdrawal Headaches

Caffeine is not addictive. Regular users of caffeine can develop tolerance and mild physical dependence, and sudden withdrawal can cause headaches and other symptoms (but only in half the population). This is does not qualify as addiction.

/ February 5, 2019

Misleading Ad for Apeaz

An ad for Apeaz in Discover Magazine is misleading. Its active ingredient may provide some temporary relief of pain, but the claims in the ad are overblown. It is not a new blockbuster drug or an anesthetic.

/ January 29, 2019

Vitamin D supplements do not reduce the risk of cancer or cardiovascular disease

Vitamin D has been widely touted as beneficial for preventing cancer and cardiovascular disease. A large, well-conducted clinical trial now show that it has no effect.

/ January 10, 2019

BladderMax: Fake News and Outrageous Headlines

A newspaper ad for BladderMax is disguised as a news story reporting "the end of bladder leakages." The information is inaccurate and the headlines are preposterous.

/ December 11, 2018

Reader’s Digest Promotes Prevagen

Reader's Digest is advertising a memory aid, Prevagen, that has been tested and shown not to work. Shame on them!

/ December 4, 2018